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Governor’s Task Force on Traumatic Brain Injury

Creation of an Advisory Board

 

This is intended to focus discussion on the task which is set forth in the Governor’s Executive Order 01-02 as follows:

 

“Review and make recommendations regarding the establishment of a Brain Injury Advisory Council in order to advise the Governor and the Legislative Assembly on the needs of persons with brain injuries, and the coordination of the delivery of services to persons with brain injuries and their families.”

 

A State Advisory Board or Council is an important component in the development of a strong, viable system to serve persons with brain injuries.  An Advisory Council can assist in developing a comprehensive approach toward building Oregon’s public systems to better serve persons with brain injuries.  The roles that the Advisory Council can play vary, but some of the goals and functions could be to: advocate for publicly funded services within state government;, help in accessing the needs of the brain injury community within the state; help in coordinating interagency collaboration and linkages between government and non-government entities; assist in planning and advocating for the development of a service system; advocating for increased dollars to serve persons with brain injuries; help in developing effective public policy strategies;

providing advice to governmental and legislative bodies about the needs of the brain injury community; and providing education, training and outreach services.

 

Discussion Issues:

§       Questions to consider when creating Advisory Board/Council

§       Issues to be addressed in formulating an Advisory Council proposal

§       Examples of Oregon Commission and Boards with Statutes (Attachment  A)

§       States with legislated Advisory Councils: Oregon Disabilities Commission, Senior Services Commission, Commission For Women (Attachment B)

§       Colorado Advisory Board Update (Attachment C)

§       Iowa Mission Statement, Statute, and By-laws (Attachment D)Attachment E:

§       Missouri Statute for Head Injury Advisory Council (Attachment E)

 

 

Need some transitional text here to indicate what follows in package? Start with discussion issues and then present resource information.

 

Issues to be addressed in formulating an Advisory Council proposal:

§         Mission?

§         Functions of council?

§         No. and composition of members?

§         Organizational location?

§         Staffing?

§         Budget?

§         Etc.

 

Questions to consider when creating Advisory Board/Council:

1)      Should we have an advisory council/board for TBI?   

2)      Should the council/board discreetly for TBI?

3)      If not, what disability council/board could we combined with?

4)      Should the council/board located within state government (ie specific agency/agencies)?   

5)      To whom does the council report? (i.e., agency administrator, division director, governor, legislature)   

6)      Should staff be assigned to the council?

7)      How many people serve on the council?   

8)      Which state agencies could/should be represented on the council?


Alcohol and Substance/Drug Abuse

Children & Families

Developmental Disabilities

Economic Development/Labor

Injury/Disability Prevention

Insurance

Medical Assistance/Medicaid

Mental Health

Protection & Advocacy

Public Safety

Special Health Care Needs

Social/Human Services

Special Education

Transportation

Vocational Rehabilitation

Other


9)      What should be the council’s composition by percentage?


Agency Staff                

Consumers                  

Family Members          

Other


      

10)  How should the council members be appointed?

11)  Should there a chairperson of the council?

12)  How should he/she be selected?   

13)  What should be the frequency of council meetings?   

14)  What participation supports should be provided to council members with disabilities?


Accommodations

Compensation for time

Expense reimbursement

Personal care attendants

Pre-meeting coaching or mentoring

Other


15)  What issues should the council address?


Prevention

Medical/Rehabilitation

Deinstitutionalization

Long-term services/supports

Systems coordination

Provider relations

Advocate relations

Other


16)  What activities should the council engage in?


Advocacy

Collaboration

Education

Funding Decisions

Information/Referral

Planning

Other

 


Approach to Task Force:

·      How should the work be divided?  Divide questions among the group?  Form separate sub-groups to answer sub-topics?

·      Should people from the outside be invited to serve? 

·      Would having guest speakers help?

·      Schedule Task Group Meetings and create a work plan.

 

 

Resource Information

 

Do we have a chart that shows the following data re: States? FWO

 

States with Advisory Council:

 

AL, CT, FL, IA, IL, MA, MI, MN, MO, NE, NM, OH, OK, SC, TN, VA, WA, WV

 

States with Legislated Advisory Councils:

 

Texas and Nevada are quasi-governmental entities funded by a mix of federal and state dollars but carried out by a private sector contractor

 

Typical Advisory Councils roles and responsibilities may include:

·Assccessing the needs of the brain injury community within respective states;

·Coordinating interagency collaboration and linkages between government and non-government entities; (not if strictly advisory?)

·Planning and advocating for the development of a service system;

·Advocating for higher priority for serving increased dollars to serve persons with brain injuries;

·Developing effective public policy strategies; [fwo note: don’t want to insist on more dollars if changing priorities can get the job done?]

·Providing advice to governmental and legislative bodies about the needs of the brain injury community; and

·Collaborating with lead State Agency in developing Providing education, training and outreach services.

· 

Issues to be addressed in formulating an Advisory Council proposal:

§            e.g., mission of council?; functions of council? # and composition of members?; organizational location? Staffing? Budget?, etc.


 

Appendix XXAttachment A:  Oregon Commission and Boards with Statutes

 

DISABILITIES COMMISSION, OREGON

ORS 185.130

 

Senate Confirmation Required

Identifies and publicizes the needs and rights of individuals with disabilities; advises the Legislature, the Governor, state, public and private agencies on disability issues; coordinates interagency delivery of disability related services; promotes rehabilitation and employment of the disabled.

 

Membership:

·        Total: 15

·        Governor Appoints: 15

·        Other Appointments: 0

 

Position Requirements:

·Majority of members shall have disabilities

·             

[Why do we need the agency history in following material about ODC? And, since ODC has programs I wouldn’t put it first. Reason for inclusion is that the role of ODC should be understood in formulating proposal for another advisoyr body on disabilities. FWO]

 

Oregon Disabilities Commission - Agency History

 

The Oregon Disabilities Commission provides advice to the state Senior and Disabled Services Division. The following agency history provides information on the evolution of that division.

 

Introduction

The Senior and Disabled Services Division [SDSD] serves senior citizens and people with disabilities through programs that encourage independence, dignity and quality of life. Services are provided through state field offices and Area Agencies on Aging, placing emphasis on local planning, decision making and service delivery.

The Division is designated as the State Unit on Aging, responsible for administering the federal Older Americans Act and the state funded Oregon Project Independence.

The Division is advised by the Governor's Commission on Senior Services, the Oregon Disabilities Commission, the Medicaid Long Term Care Quality and Reimbursement Advisory Council, and Disability Services Advisory Councils throughout the state.

Revenue is from a variety of federal funds such as Title XIX, Title XVIII, Older Americans Act, and food stamps. Other sources include state appropriated funds, and a variety of fees, collections and recoveries.

 

History

Planning and concern for the elderly began in earnest in 1957 with a State Council on Aging (ORS 414). Its duties included many of the same functions as those of the current Division. The Council was abolished in July 1963.

In 1975, the Legislative Assembly directed the Department of Human Resources to develop and place in effect a program of supportive social services for persons age 60 or older. At the same time a position of Special Assistant for Programs for the Elderly in the Office of the Director of the Department of Human Resources was created. This position's duties, besides being executive officer of the Governor's Committee on Aging, were to coordinate the various programs within the department that related to aging and to act as an advocate for senior citizens.

In 1977, the Office of Elderly Affairs was established. It combined into one agency the State Program on Aging and Office of the Special Assistant on Elderly Programs. The Office's duties were to administer and manage federal funds for local and regional service programs under Title III (community grants), Title VII (nutrition programs), and other titles in the Older Americans Act.

Oregon Project Independence was created by the 1977 Legislative Assembly to provide support services for elderly persons diagnosed as having Alzeimer's disease or a related disorder. The state funded Project Independence program provides support services for those who are 1) 60 and older and, 2) without outside help and on the verge of entering an institution, but 3) not under Title XIX of the Social Service Block Grant. A priority system seeks to prevent the institutionalization of individuals who can be kept at home or elsewhere short of some type of institutionalization by giving them (on a fee schedule) homemaking, housekeeping, chores, escorts, home health and/or personal care assistance.

In 1981, the Legislative Assembly established the Senior Services Division as the single state Agency to receive and disburse federal funds under Titles XIX and XX of the Social Security Act, the Older American Act, and state funds under Project Independence. The Division was to disburse the funds to local Area Agencies on Aging. The local agencies were to administer necessary care and services. This was the first time, in any state, that a single administrative unit was assigned all these responsibilities.

Nineteen eighty seven saw the duty of licensing long term care facilities transferred to the Senior Services Division from the Health Division. The Division also was given responsibility to license and regulate Adult Foster Homes.

In 1989, the Senior Services Division became the Senior and Disabled Services Division. The Legislative Assembly transferred to the Division the responsibility to determine eligibility for cash, medical assistance, and food stamps for virtually all elderly persons and persons with disabilities. It was also given responsibility to license and regulate Retirement Communities.

In 1991, the Division was charged with licensing and regulating Residential Treatment Facilities. It was also directed to develop a registry of and voluntary rules for Adult Day Care facilities for functionally or cognitively impaired adults.

The 1995 Legislative Assembly created the Medicaid Long Term Care Quality and Reimbursement Advisory Council. The 12-member Council acts in an advisory capacity to the Senior and Disabled Services Division on matters pertaining to quality of long term care facilities and community-based care facilities and reimbursement for long term care facilities and community-based care services.

The Elder Abuse Prevention Act was enacted by the 1995 Legislative Assembly to provide a specific legal means of relief for persons over 65 who are in immediate and present danger of being abused, neglected or abandoned. Any elderly person who has been the victim of abuse within the preceding 180 days may petition the circuit court for relief. The act requires the Division to provide information about local adult protective services, domestic violence shelters and local legal services to the circuit courts to be given to elderly persons who have filed petitions for relief of abuse.

 

Organization And Duties Of The Division

Structurally a Division in the Department of Human Resources, Senior Services was originally composed of three parts - Central Office, Field Branch, and Field Volunteers. The Central Office originally consisted of the Administrator's Office, Business Services Section, Audit and Data Processing Section, Program Operations Section, and Field Operations Section. The Administrator's Office's was to staff the Governor's Commission on Senior Services, coordinate with the Long Term Care Ombudsman (at that time in the Governor's Office), and administer the Advocacy Assistance Grant.

The Senior Services Division provided support for the Long Term Care Ombudsman program which was located in the Governor's Office. This support was funded from the Advocacy Assistance Grant and Title IV-A Older Americans Act training funds.

The Business Services Section was responsible for budgeting, accounting, and distributing commodities to Area Agencies on Aging, payment of invoices, financial reporting, maintaining the Federal Cost Allocation Plan, developing and administering contracts, and providing payroll, purchasing, property, communications, vehicle, forms control and records management services.

The Audit and Data Processing Section reviewed the financial records and reports from nursing facilities providing services to Medicaid residents. The data gathered was used to establish reimbursement rates for each facility and to compute ceiling rates.

The Program Operations Section wrote and published Oregon Administrative Rules and program policy and procedures, and developed, prepared, and monitored the Long Term Care budget. In short, this section set the direction for program and services provided elderly and certain disabled persons. Furthermore, it ran the Senior Community Services Employment Program (Title V Older Americans Act). This program permitted part time work for low income persons who were at least 55 years old. Finally, the section contracted with the Health Division to certify nursing facilities for Medicaid and to license residential care facilities and contracted with the Oregon Foundation for Medical Care for quality assurance of resident care and utilization review for Medicaid nursing facility residents.

Field Operations Section supervised employees in field offices, the volunteer program, coordinated training for the Division, and provided liaison and technical support to Area Agencies on Aging in the eighteen AAA districts.

Two types of Area Agencies on Aging were created by the Legislative Assembly. Type A date from the Office of Elderly Affairs. These units operate the programs under the Older Americans Act and Oregon Project Independence. Here the functions of Senior Services Units remain under direct Division control. Type B is an alternative encouraged by federal law and permitted by state law when the Division was established. These units can administer all existing programs regardless of fund origins.

 

Current Organization

The Division is currently composed of the Administrator's Office, the Long Term Care Quality Section, the Program and Resource Development Section, the Field Services Section, the Research and Finance Section, and the Consumer Relations and Community Education Section.

The Division Administrator's Office provides overall administrative and program direction for the Division. Specific functions include coordination with other Divisions of the Department of Human Resources, state and federal agencies, the Legislative Assembly, advocacy groups, and providers. Contracting and other administrative support services are also provided by the DHR Director's Office.

The Long Term Care Quality Section was formed as a result of the 1997 Division realignment. It oversees the Community Based Care Policy and Rule Team, Community Based Care Quality Improvement Team, Community Based Care Standards of Practice Team, Community Based Care Corrective Action Team, Nursing Facility Policy and Corrective Action Team, Nursing Facility Utilization and Review Team, Nursing Facility Licensing Program, Nursing Facility Care Quality Improvement Unit, and three Client Care Monitoring Units.

The Community Based Care Policy and Rule Team develops policies and Oregon Administrative Rules covering the operation of Adult Foster Care facilities, Residential Foster Care facilities, Continuing Care Retirement Centers, Assisted Living Facilities, and In-home services.

The Community Based Care Quality Improvement Team performs random monitoring of community based care facilities such as Adult Foster Care facilities, Residential Foster Care facilities, Continuing Care Retirement Centers, and Assisted Living Facilities. The Team observes and evaluates the operation of each facility for the purpose of providing assistance and training. The Team refers problems to SDSD Field offices to investigate. Legitimate complaints are then forwarded to the Community Based Care Corrective Action Team.

The Community Based Care Standards of Practice Team develops standards of practice for the staffs of Adult Foster Care facilities, Residential Foster Care facilities, Continuing Care Retirement Centers, Assisted Living Facilities, and In-home services. The team also develops and presents training to facility staff members.

The Community Based Care Corrective Action Team receives complaints and investigations from Division field offices regarding Adult Foster Care facilities, Residential Care facilities, Continuing Care Retirement Centers and Assisted Living Facilities. They also receive community complaints regarding persons in their own homes. The team evaluates the complaint to see if a Division Administrative Rule has been violated. It then determines the appropriate sanction to impose. Sanctions include civil penalty, conditions on the facility's license, and revoking the license. If the facility does not respond to a civil penalty their Medicaid funding can be stopped. Facility operators may appeal a sanction at an informal hearing, or a formal Administrative Hearing at the field office.

The Nursing Facility Licensing Program licenses Nursing Homes, Assisted Living Facilities, and Residential Care Facilities. Each facility must be licensed to begin operation and before ownership changes. Licenses are renewed annually.

The Nursing Facility Utilization Review Team reviews and evaluates the level of care given to nursing home patients to determine if their care warrants additional Medicaid reimbursement to the facility for complex medical services. A Resident Care Review Specialist visits each facility and evaluates individual patient charts to determine if the patient's condition requires aggressive medical treatment involving additional time or complex skills above normal treatment levels. Information gathered from individual patient records is then used to determine if the facility should receive, or continue to receive, additional Medicaid reimbursement for complex medical services for specific patients.

The Nursing Facility Policy and Corrective Action Team receives complaints and investigations from Division field offices regarding Nursing Facilities. The team evaluates the complaint to see if a Division Administrative Rule has been violated. It then determines the appropriate sanction to impose. Sanctions include civil penalty, conditions on the facility's license, and revoking the license. If the facility does not respond to a civil penalty their Medicare/Medicaid funding can be stopped. The program also develops patient care policies for nursing facilities.

The Client Care Monitoring Units operate a statewide program which performs federally mandated surveys for Medicare/Medicaid certification of long term care facilities and for state licensure of long term care and residential care facilities. These no-notice surveys are intended to ensure that care and services rendered to residents of these facilities are adequate and of appropriate quality. The federal Health Care Financing Administration does spot checks of random facilities. The Unit also does complaint investigation of facility-wide problems. Currently there are CCMU's in Tualatin, Albany and Medford.

The Program and Resource Development Section is responsible for developing programs and resources to meet the needs of a dramatically expanding elderly and disabled population. This Section was formed as a result of the 1997 realignment of Senior and Disabled Services Division. Its primary work will be to coordinate and collaborate with senior and disabled advocates, other elements of the Department of Human Resources, other government agencies, private, non-profit agencies, and the business community. It will direct its efforts to plan and implement specific long-term priorities and objectives in support of SDSD's Strategic Plan.

The Field Services Section oversees the Training and Education Unit, Provider Services Unit, Senior Employment Coordinator, Field Services Unit, Office Planning Unit, and Division Field offices.

The Training and Education Unit provides long-range staff development for Senior and Disabled Services Division and Area Agencies on Aging employees and volunteers.

The Provider Services Unit is responsible for ensuring that facilities, firms and individuals who provide health care and related services to SDSD clients are paid for their services in a timely fashion. The Unit enrolls businesses and/or individuals who have been certified or licensed to provide services to SDSD clients. It also identifies and recovers overpayments. The providers consist of Nursing Homes, Assisted Living Facilities, Residential Care Facilities, Adult Foster Care Homes, client employed providers, meal site providers and contract nurses. These providers are paid by SDSD from Medicaid, Oregon Project Independence, and state funds.

The IVES Program [Income, Verification, Eligibility System] discovers income discrepancies by matching IRS 1099 information with income information in SDSD Client Case Files.

The Provider Services Unit Non-Medical Transportation Program is responsible for developing a statewide system to provide non-medical transportation for Division clients residing in community based care.

In addition a Unit Health Plan Coordinator provides information and training to Field Staff and other Division employees to ensure that they are able to administer the Oregon Health Plan in accordance with established laws, rules and policies.

The Consumer Complaints Coordinator ensures that consumer complaints are handled expediently and appropriately.

The Senior Employment Coordinator administers grants and contracts associated with Title V of the Older Americans Act which provides part-time, community service employment for low-income individuals age 55 and over. The Division receives grants from the U. S. Department of Labor and issues 1-year contracts to employment and training agencies around the state to implement the program at the local level.

The Field Services Unit supervises the field office managers and provides administrative and technical support to field office managers and staff. The Unit also provides interpretation of federal regulations and Division polices and procedures and helps coordinate case management.

Field Offices provide direct assistance to elderly and disabled clients. There are two basic types of field offices. Disability Services Offices (DSO) provide services to people between 18 and 65 with disabilities. Multi-Service Offices (MSO) provide services to both elderly and disabled clients. The Division contracts with Area Agencies on Aging (AAA) to provide services in many communities. Some of these agencies are under local governments, others are nonprofit private organizations. Types of federal public assistance provided include Medicaid, General Assistance, and food stamps.

Field offices provide a variety of services designed to assist elderly and disabled persons to live as independently as possible. Specific services to clients include home and personal care and special needs such as wheelchair ramps and home delivered meals. Services also include substitute living arrangements such Adult Foster Homes, Residential Care Facilities, and nursing facility placement. The state funded Oregon Project Independence provides assistance to persons diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease or related disorders.

All field offices perform the same basic functions for elderly and/or disabled clients. Specific functions include eligibility determination, needs assessment and developing an individual case plan to meet needs, case management, coordination of service delivery, client advocacy, elder abuse and community protective services, and information and referral.

The Office Planning Unit procures facilities, equipment and support for field offices. The Unit negotiates and administers leases and agreements for office space and related services including telecommunications. It plans office space utilization and coordinates moves. In addition the Office Planning Unit coordinates risk management for the Division. It acts as a point of contact with the State Motor Pool and monitors state and rental car usage.

Research and Finance Section includes the Budget Unit, the Estate Administration Unit, the Financial Audit Unit, the Program Analysis Unit, and staff support to the Medicaid Long Term Care Quality and Reimbursement Advisory Council.

The Budget Unit develops the Division's biennial budget and monitors budget expenditures during the biennium. The Unit also revises the budget semi-annually for re submission to the Emergency Board.

The Estate Administration Unit recovers funds from the estates of deceased clients for medical assistance paid on their behalf (Medicaid Recovery). The Unit also assists field staff with Conservatorships for living clients and provides technical advice on real property issues.

The Financial Audit Unit audits Nursing Facility Financial Statements to determine appropriate Medicaid cost reimbursement for each facility. Audits result in Settlements regarding reimbursement for the facility's costs over the past year, and in rate setting for the following year. The Unit also evaluates and develops potential changes to the nursing facility reimbursement system and reports findings.

The Program Analysis Unit does research and analysis concerning the operation and policies of the long term care and cash assistance programs. The primary product is reports for management containing analysis and recommendations regarding long term care policies and operations.

The Medicaid Long Term Care Quality and Reimbursement Advisory Council advises the Senior and Disabled Services Division on changes or modifications to the Medicaid reimbursement system and the adverse and positive effects of proposed changes or modifications on the quality of long term care and community-based care services.

The Consumer Relations and Community Education Section performs a variety of functions related to developing and coordinating policy regarding internal and external communications and public education for the Senior and Disabled Services Division and the Department of Human Resources. The Section helps Division units develop policies and rules. It provides staff to the Governor's Commission on Senior Services. It also provides staff assistance to the private Advocacy Coalition, and acts as a liaison with the Oregon Disability Commission.

The Section develops, coordinates and monitors local, state and federal legislation related to services to seniors and people with disabilities. It produces publications, such as the "What's Up" newsletter, which is distributed to public and private organizations and individuals interested in Division activities and other services to senior citizens and persons with disabilities.

The Policy and Rules Program prepares policies, procedures and Oregon Administrative Rules to comply with and implement federal, state, and judicial requirements relating to Division programs. The Program files and distributes Oregon Administrative Rules for the entire Division.

Policy and Rules also develops, monitors and amends the Division's portion of State Plans which implement federally mandated and funded programs and services. Examples include the Medicaid State Plan and Federal Medicaid Waivers for Community Based Care.

The Governor's Commission on Senior Services is the official advisory body to the Governor, the Director of the Department of Human Resources, and the Senior and Disabled Services Division. The Commission advises on needs of elderly persons, recommends actions to meet the needs of seniors, and acts as an advocate for the elderly.

 

Revenue Sources

Federal:

Older Americans Act - funds for Area Agencies on Aging.

Social Security Act, Titles XVIII [Medicare] provides funding for administration of the certification surveys of nursing homes;

Title XIX [Medicaid] provides financing for long term medical care in institutional and community based care settings;

and Title XX ;

Department of Agriculture, Cash in-lieu and food stamps.

State:

General Fund;

Other Funds such as licensing fees, penalty payments, estates recoveries, program recoveries and collections.

Local:

Support for Area Agencies on Aging.

 

Bibliography

Administrative Overview, Senior Services Division, October 1987.

Budget, Agency Request, 1983-85.

House Human Resources Committee, Minutes and Exhibits re. SB 955, 1981.

Legislatively Adopted Budget, 1995-1997.

Oregon Laws, 1957, CH 692; 1959, CH 41; 1961, CH 130; 1963, CH 631; 1967, CH 505; 1971, CH 319 and 774; 1974 SS, HJR 84; 1975, CH 55 and 768; 1977, CH 661, 837 and 845; 1979, CH 544; 1981, CH 163, 186 and 784; 1983, CH 525; 1985, CH 642; 1987 CH 428, 430, 431, 523; 1989 CH 693, 787; 1991 CH 775, 787 and 801; 1995, CH 637, 642, 666 and 671.

 

Bibliography

ORS 107; ORS 124; ORS 185; ORS 186; ORS 410; ORS 442; ORS 443.

Secretary of State, Oregon Blue Book, 1957-1998.

SDSD Central Office Realignment, July 7, 1997 (Division Administrator's memo)

Senior and Disabled Services Division website: http://www.sdsd.dhr.state.or.us/

Senior Services Division, Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, July 1884-June 1985, November 14, 1985.

 

Selected Chronology

1957 A State Council on Aging was established.

1963 State Council on Aging was abolished.

1977 The Office of Elderly Affairs was established in the Department of Human Resources.

1981 The Senior Services Division was established. It was to be the single state agency to receive and disburse federal funds under Titles XIX and XX of the Social Security Act, the Older American Act, and state funds under Oregon Project Independence.

Oregon Project Independence was created to provide support services for elderly persons diagnosed as having Alzheimer's disease or a related disorder.

1987 The duty of licensing long term care facilities was transferred from the Health Division to the Senior Services Division.

1989 The Division became the Senior and Disabled Services Division. It was given the responsibility for virtually all elderly persons and persons with disabilities.

1991 The Division was charged with licensing and regulating Residential Treatment Facilities and Adult Foster Homes.

1995 The Elder Abuse Prevention Act was enacted.

1997 Internal realignment of programs and functions within the central office. The general goal was to refocus division resources to improve quality of service and client satisfaction.

 

 

Oregon Disabilities Commission - Present Duties and Responsibilities

 

The Oregon Disabilities Commission identifies and publicizes the needs and rights of individuals with disabilities; advises the legislature, the governor, state agencies and other public and private agencies on disability issues; coordinates inter-agency efforts in the delivery of disability-related services, and promotes the rehabilitation and employment of the disabled. The commission conducts Oregon's Client Assistance Program, which helps clients in federally funded rehabilitation programs by explaining rules and procedures, client rights and responsibilities, and mediating conflicts. The Deaf and Hard of Hearing Access Program assists state agencies in ensuring that programs and services are accessible to deaf and hearing impaired persons.

The commission has been designated the coordinator for implementing the American with Disabilities Act in Oregon. The Oregon Disabilities Commission also administers Technology Access for Life Needs (TALN). TALN provides information and advocacy on assistive technology for people with disabilities. Commissioners are appointed by the governor and confirmed by the senate for not more than two consecutive three-year terms.

185.110 Definitions for ORS 185.110 to 185.230. As used in ORS 185.110 to 185.230, unless the context requires otherwise:

(1) "Advocate self-help group" means any organized group of individuals with disabilities who have joined together for purposes of informing the public of their needs and obtaining resources, services and benefits for their membership.

(2) "Consumer" means an individual with a disability, or a parent or legal guardian, other than the State of Oregon, of an individual with a disability, who utilizes the services made available by public and private organizations which serve individuals with disabilities.

(3) "Disabled individual" means anyone who:

(a) Has a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits one or more of the individual’s major life activities;

(b) Has a record of such impairment; or

(c) Is regarded as having such an impairment.

(4) "Sign language interpreter" means a person who is readily able to communicate with a hearing impaired person, translate proceedings or conversations and accurately repeat and translate the statements of a hearing impaired person. [1983 c.726 §1; 1989 c.224 §15; 1991 c.365 §1]

185.120 Policy. (1) The Legislative Assembly finds that there is a costly lack of coordination among the numerous public and private agencies and organizations serving individuals with disabilities in Oregon. There is, therefore, a need for an Oregon Disabilities Commission to act as a link among and between these entities so that limited resources can be used most efficiently better to serve the needs of individuals with disabilities.

(2) The Legislative Assembly further finds that there is a need for an Oregon Disabilities Commission to work for the implementation and establishment of economic, social, legal and political equity of individuals with disabilities. [1983 c.726 §2; 1989 c.224 §16; 1989 c.657 §1]

185.130 Oregon Disabilities Commission; qualifications; confirmation. (1) The Oregon Disabilities Commission is created consisting of 15 members appointed by the Governor for not more than two consecutive three-year terms.

(2) Prior to making appointments, the Governor shall request and consider recommendations from advocate self-help groups and other interested public and private agencies.

(3) The membership of the commission shall be composed of members broadly representative of major public and private agencies who are experienced in or have demonstrated particular interest in the special needs of individuals with disabilities and consumers. Appointments shall be made with considerations given to geographic representation and a majority shall be individuals with disabilities as defined in ORS 185.110 (3). Appointments to the commission shall be subject to Senate confirmation as provided in ORS 171.562 and 171.565. [1983 c.726 §3; 1987 c.80 §1; 1989 c.224 §17]

185.140 Advisory function. (1) The Oregon Disabilities Commission shall:

(a) Advise the Department of Human Services, the Governor, the Legislative Assembly and appropriate state agency administrators on services and resources needed to serve disabled individuals and recommend action by the Governor, the Legislative Assembly, state agencies, other governmental entities and the private sector appropriate to meet such needs.

(b) Advise the Governor, state and local elected officials and managers of public and private firms and agencies on issues related to achieving full economic, social, legal and political equity for individuals with disabilities.

(2) The commission in no way shall impinge upon the authority or responsibilities of any other existing or duly appointed commissions, boards, councils or committees. The commission shall act as a coordinating link between and among public and private organizations serving disabled individuals. [1983 c.726 §§4, 8(2); 1989 c.224 §18; 1989 c.470 §3; 1989 c.657 §2]

185.150 Duties. The duties of the Oregon Disabilities Commission shall combine the functions of the Governor’s Steering Committee on the Handicapped and the Governor’s Committee on Employment of the Handicapped, and shall include:

(1) Identifying and hearing the concerns of individuals with disabilities;

(2) Publicizing the needs and concerns of individuals with disabilities as they relate to the full achievement of economic, social, legal and political equity;

(3) Advising the Department of Human Services, the Governor, the Legislative Assembly and appropriate state agency administrators on how state services for individuals with disabilities might be improved or better coordinated to meet the needs of the individuals with disabilities;

(4) Advising local government agencies on matters which affect individuals with disabilities;

(5) Submitting a report of commission activities and recommendations to the Governor at least annually, and to the Legislative Assembly at least biennially and nominating qualified individuals with disabilities for appointment to boards, commissions and policy level management and professional positions;

(6) Studying and reporting on state agency programs and budgets that affect individuals with disabilities;

(7) Informing individuals with disabilities where they may obtain assistance in rehabilitation and employment and about laws prohibiting discrimination in employment as a result of disability;

(8) Cooperating with and assisting other interest groups in rehabilitation and employment of individuals with disabilities and encouraging public and private employers to undertake affirmative action to assure equitable employment of individuals with disabilities;

(9) Giving impetus and assistance to local community committees and fostering a more equitable climate for rehabilitation and equitable employment of individuals with disabilities;

(10) Promoting a continuous program of information and education to employers and the general public so they are aware of and sensitive to the needs and desires of individuals with disabilities for equitable education and training that will assure individuals with disabilities of their full vocational potentials;

(11) Promoting a continuous information program for placement of individuals with disabilities in suitable employment;

(12) Coordinating and executing programs of the President’s Committee on Employment of the Handicapped, if any, and participating with other groups in sponsoring suitable public recognition programs for individuals with disabilities; and

(13) Assisting members of the public and state agencies in making agency programs available and accessible to individuals who are deaf and hearing impaired. The Deaf and Hearing Impaired Access Program shall perform the activities of this effort. [1983 c.726 §5; 1989 c.47 §1; 1989 c.224 §19; 1989 c.470 §4; 1989 c.657 §3]

185.155 Monitoring of progress of institutions of higher education and colleges in eliminating barriers to access. The Oregon Disabilities Commission shall monitor the progress of each institution or college in accomplishing the elimination of barriers to access and shall be consulted if access needs and priorities determined by the physical access committee are significantly revised. The commission may recommend revision if the commission believes the needs or priorities, or both, should be changed. [1991 c.935 §4]

Note: 185.155 was enacted into law by the Legislative Assembly but was not added to or made a part of ORS chapter 185 or any series therein by legislative action. See Preface to Oregon Revised Statutes for further explanation.

185.160 Oregon Disabilities Commission Account; application for funds. (1) The Oregon Disabilities Commission may apply for federal, state or private funds.

(2) The Oregon Disabilities Commission Account is established separate and distinct from the General Fund. All moneys received by the commission, other than appropriations from the General Fund, shall be deposited into the account and are continuously appropriated to the commission to carry out the duties, functions and powers of the commission. [1983 c.726 §6; 1989 c.224 §20; 2001 c.716 §21]

185.165 [1991 c.748 §3; repealed by 2001 c.716 §30]

185.170 Retaliation for legislative testimony prohibited. No employer shall retaliate against any employee member of the Oregon Disabilities Commission for any testimony given by the member of the commission before the Legislative Assembly or a legislative committee. [1983 c.726 §7; 1989 c.224 §21]

185.180 Executive director; secretary; staff. (1) The Oregon Disabilities Commission may employ an executive director, who shall be in the exempt service and who shall be responsible for the performance of duties as assigned by the commission.

(2) Subject to any applicable provisions of State Personnel Relations Law, the executive director may appoint a secretary, whose duties shall be prescribed and compensation fixed by the executive director.

(3) Subject to the State Personnel Relations Law, the executive director, in cooperation with the commission, may employ appropriate staff to carry out the activities outlined in ORS 185.150 (13). [1983 c.726 §§8(1), 9; 1989 c.47 §2; 1989 c.224 §22]

185.190 Meetings; quorum; duties of chairperson. The Oregon Disabilities Commission shall meet at a place, date and hour determined by the commission. The commission shall meet at other times and places specified by the call of the chairperson or a majority of the members of the commission. A majority of the members of the commission constitutes a quorum for the transaction of business. The chairperson shall exercise powers necessary for the performance of the functions of the office of the chairperson as determined by the commission. [1983 c.726 §10; 1985 c.184 §3; 1987 c.80 §2; 1989 c.224 §23; 1999 c.26 §1]

185.200 Compensation and expenses. Members of the Oregon Disabilities Commission shall receive compensation and expenses as provided in ORS 292.495. Travel and per diem for state employees shall be compensated by the commission. [1983 c.726 §11; 1989 c.224 §24]


 I would take the following OAR’s out, including the information on budget. Too much detail for TF. And, we are not contemplating a budget anywhere near that of the ODC. Can include this as a reference if it needs to be reviewed and analyzed. FWO]

The Oregon Administrative Rules contain OARs filed through May 15, 2002

 OREGON DISABILITIES COMMISSION

DIVISION 1

PROCEDURAL RULES

405-001-0000

Notice Rule

Prior to adoption, amendment or repeal of any rule, the Oregon Disabilities Commission shall give notice of the intended action:

(1) In the Secretary of State's Bulletin referred to in ORS 183.360 at least 15 days before the effective date of the intended action;

(2) By mailing a copy of the notice to persons on the Oregon Disabilities Commission's mailing list established pursuant to ORS 183.335(7); and

(3) By mailing or furnishing a copy of the notice to:

(a) The United Press International;

(b) The Associated Press;

(c) The Oregon Association of the Deaf, Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf, Inc., Oregon Chapter: Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf, Inc., Tucker-Maxon Oral School, Director, Department of Human Resources, Department of Education: Special Education, all agencies being served by the Deaf and Hearing Imparied Access Program (DHIAP), Self Help for Hard-of-Hearing People: Local Organizations; and all contracted communication service providers (interpreters, captioners, etc.),

(d) Oregon Administrative Law News;

(e) Capitol Press Room.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 185.110 – ORS 185.200
Stats. Implemented:
Hist.: ODC 1-1992, f. 2-18-92, cert. ef. 3-16-92

405-001-0005

Model Rules of Procedure

The Oregon Disabilities Commission, at a meeting on November 7, 1991, adopted the Attorney General's Model Rules of Procedure October 15, 1989 revision as the official rule making procedure of the Commission. All rules developed by the Commission will follow the processes outlined in the Attorney General's Model Rules of Procedure.

[ED. NOTE: The full text of the Attorney General's Model Rules of Procedure is available from the agency.]

Stat. Auth.: ORS 185.110 – ORS 185.200
Stats. Implemented:
Hist.: ODC 1-1991, f. 11-18-91, cert. ef. 1-20-92

405-001-0010

Confidentiality and Inadmissibility of Mediation Communications

(1) The words and phrases used in this rule have the same meaning as given to them in ORS 36.110 and 36.234.

(2) Nothing in this rule affects any confidentiality created by other law. Nothing in this rule relieves a public body from complying with the Public Meetings Law, ORS 192.610 to 192.690. Whether or not they are confidential under this or other rules of the agency, mediation communications are exempt from disclosure under the Public Records Law to the extent provided in ORS 192.410 to 192.505.

(3) This rule applies only to mediations in which the agency is a party or is mediating a dispute as to which the agency has regulatory authority. This rule does not apply when the agency is acting as the "mediator" in a matter in which the agency also is a party as defined in ORS 36.234.

(4) To the extent mediation communications would otherwise be compromise negotiations under ORS 40.190 (OEC Rule 408), those mediation communications are not admissible as provided in ORS 40.190 (OEC Rule 408), notwithstanding any provisions to the contrary in section (9) of this rule.

(5) Mediations Excluded. Sections (6) - (10) of this rule do not apply to:

(a) Mediation of workplace interpersonal disputes involving the interpersonal relationships between this agency's employees, officials or employees and officials, unless a formal grievance under a labor contract, a tort claim notice or a lawsuit has been filed; or

(b) Mediation in which the person acting as the mediator will also act as the hearings officer in a contested case involving some or all of the same matters;

(c) Mediation in which the only parties are public bodies;

(d) Mediation involving two or more public bodies and a private party if the laws, rule or policies governing mediation confidentiality for at least one of the public bodies provide that mediation communications in the mediation are not confidential;

(e) Mediation involving 15 or more parties if the agency has designated that another mediation confidentiality rule adopted by the agency may apply to that mediation.

(6) Disclosures by Mediator. A mediator may not disclose or be compelled to disclose mediation communications in a mediation and, if disclosed, such communications may not be introduced into evidence in any subsequent administrative, judicial or arbitration proceeding unless:

(a) All the parties to the mediation and the mediator agree in writing to the disclosure; or

(b) The mediation communication may be disclosed or introduced into evidence in a subsequent proceeding as provided in subsection (c) - (d), (j) - (l) or (o) - (p) of section (9) of this rule.

(7) Confidentiality and Inadmissibility of Mediation Communications. Except as provided in sections (8) - (9) of this rule, mediation communications are confidential and may not be disclosed to any other person, are not admissible in any subsequent administrative, judicial or arbitration proceeding and may not be disclosed during testimony in, or during any discovery conducted as part of a subsequent proceeding, or introduced as evidence by the parties or the mediator in any subsequent proceeding.

(8) Written Agreement. Section (7) of this rule does not apply to a mediation unless the parties to the mediation agree in writing, as provided in this section, that the mediation communications in the mediation will be confidential and/or nondiscoverable and inadmissible. If the mediator is the employee of and acting on behalf of a state agency, the mediator or an authorized agency representative must also sign the agreement. The parties' agreement to participate in a confidential mediation must be in substantially the following form. This form may be used separately or incorporated into an "agreement to mediate." [Form not included. See ED. NOTE.]

(9) Exceptions to confidentiality and inadmissibility.

(a) Any statements, memoranda, work products, documents and other materials, otherwise subject to discovery that were not prepared specifically for use in the mediation are not confidential and may be disclosed or introduced into evidence in a subsequent proceeding.

(b) Any mediation communications that are public records, as defined in ORS 192.410(4), and were not specifically prepared for use in the mediation are not confidential and may be disclosed or introduced into evidence in a subsequent proceeding unless the substance of the communication is confidential or privileged under state or federal law.

(c) A mediation communication is not confidential and may be disclosed by any person receiving the communication to the extent that person reasonably believes that disclosing the communication is necessary to prevent the commission of a crime that is likely to result in death or bodily injury to any person. A mediation communication is not confidential and may be disclosed in a subsequent proceeding to the extent its disclosure may further the investigation or prosecution of a felony crime involving physical violence to a person.

(d) Any mediation communication related to the conduct of a licensed professional that is made to or in the presence of a person who, as a condition of his or her professional license, is obligated to report such communication by law or court rule is not confidential and may be disclosed to the extent necessary to make such a report.

(e) The parties to the mediation may agree in writing that all or part of the mediation communications are not confidential or that all or part of the mediation communications may be disclosed and may be introduced into evidence in a subsequent proceeding unless the substance of the communication is confidential, privileged or otherwise prohibited from disclosure under state or federal law.

(f) A party to the mediation may disclose confidential mediation communications to a person if the party's communication with that person is privileged under ORS chapter 40 or other provision of law. A party to the mediation may disclose confidential mediation communications to a person for the purpose of obtaining advice concerning the subject matter of the mediation, if all the parties agree.

(g) An employee of the agency may disclose confidential mediation communications to another agency employee so long as the disclosure is necessary to conduct authorized activities of the agency. An employee receiving a confidential mediation communication under this subsection is bound by the same confidentiality requirements as apply to the parties to the mediation.

(h) A written mediation communication may be disclosed or introduced as evidence in a subsequent proceeding at the discretion of the party who prepared the communication so long as the communication is not otherwise confidential under state or federal law and does not contain confidential information from the mediator or another party who does not agree to the disclosure.

(i) In any proceeding to enforce, modify or set aside a mediation agreement, a party to the mediation may disclose mediation communications and such communications may be introduced as evidence to the extent necessary to prosecute or defend the matter. At the request of a party, the court may seal any part of the record of the proceeding to prevent further disclosure of mediation communications or agreements to persons other than the parties to the agreement.

(j) In an action for damages or other relief between a party to the mediation and a mediator or mediation program, mediation communications are not confidential and may be disclosed and may be introduced as evidence to the extent necessary to prosecute or defend the matter. At the request of a party, the court may seal any part of the record of the proceeding to prevent further disclosure of the mediation communications or agreements.

(k) When a mediation is conducted as part of the negotiation of a collective bargaining agreement, the following mediation communications are not confidential and such communications may be introduced into evidence in a subsequent administrative, judicial or arbitration proceeding:

(A) A request for mediation, or

(B) A communication from the Employment Relations Board Conciliation Service establishing the time and place of mediation, or

(C) A final offer submitted by the parties to the mediator pursuant to ORS 243.712, or

(D) A strike notice submitted to the Employment Relations Board.

(l) To the extent a mediation communication contains information the substance of which is required to be disclosed by Oregon statute, other than ORS 192.410 to 192.505, that portion of the communication may be disclosed as required by statute.

(m) Written mediation communications prepared by or for the agency or its attorney are not confidential and may be disclosed and may be introduced as evidence in any subsequent administrative, judicial or arbitration proceeding to the extent the communication does not contain confidential information from the mediator or another party, except for those written mediation communications that are:

(A) Attorney-client privileged communications so long as they have been disclosed to no one other than the mediator in the course of the mediation or to persons as to whom disclosure of the communication would not waive the privilege, or

(B) Attorney work product prepared in anticipation of litigation or for trial, or

(C) Prepared exclusively for the mediator or in a caucus session and not given to another party in the mediation other than a state agency, or

(D) Prepared in response to the written request of the mediator for specific documents or information and given to another party in the mediation, or

(E) Settlement concepts or proposals, shared with the mediator or other parties.

(n) A mediation communication made to the agency may be disclosed and may be admitted into evidence to the extent the Agency Director determines that disclosure of the communication is necessary to prevent or mitigate a serious danger to the public's health or safety, and the communication is not otherwise confidential or privileged under state or federal law.

(o) The terms of any mediation agreement are not confidential and may be introduced as evidence in a subsequent proceeding, except to the extent the terms of the agreement are exempt from disclosure under ORS 192.410 to 192.505, a court has ordered the terms to be confidential under ORS 30.402 or state or federal law requires the terms to be confidential.

(p) The mediator may report the disposition of a mediation to the agency at the conclusion of the mediation so long as the report does not disclose specific confidential mediation communications. The agency or the mediator may use or disclose confidential mediation communications for research, training or educational purposes, subject to the provisions of ORS 36.232(4).

(10) When a mediation is subject to section (7) of this rule, the agency will provide to all parties to the mediation and the mediator a copy of this rule or a citation to the rule and an explanation of where a copy of the rule may be obtained. Violation of this provision does not waive confidentiality or inadmissibility.

[ED. NOTE: The form referenced in this rule is not printed in the OAR Compilation. Copies are available from the agency.]

Stat. Auth.: ORS 36.224
Stats. Implemented: ORS 36.224, ORS 36.228, ORS 36.230 & ORS 36.232
Hist.: ODC 1-2000, f. & cert. ef. 10-18-00

405-001-0015

Confidentiality and Inadmissibility of Workplace Interpersonal Dispute Mediation Communications

(1) This rule applies to workplace interpersonal disputes, which are disputes involving the interpersonal relationships between this agency's employees, officials or employees and officials. This rule does not apply to disputes involving the negotiation of labor contracts or matters about which a formal grievance under a labor contract, a tort claim notice or a lawsuit has been filed.

(2) The words and phrases used in this rule have the same meaning as given to them in ORS 36.110 and 36.234.

(3) Nothing in this rule affects any confidentiality created by other law.

(4) To the extent mediation communications would otherwise be compromise negotiations under ORS 40.190 (OEC Rule 408), those mediation communications are not admissible as provided in ORS 40.190 (OEC Rule 408), notwithstanding any provisions to the contrary in section (9) of this rule.

(5) Disclosures by Mediator. A mediator may not disclose or be compelled to disclose mediation communications in a mediation and, if disclosed, such communications may not be introduced into evidence in any subsequent administrative, judicial or arbitration proceeding unless:

(a) All the parties to the mediation and the mediator agree in writing to the disclosure; or

(b) The mediation communication may be disclosed or introduced into evidence in a subsequent proceeding as provided in subsections (c) or (h) - (j) of sections (7) of this rule.

(6) Confidentiality and Inadmissibility of Mediation Communication. Except as provided in section (7) of this rule, mediation communications in mediations involving workplace interpersonal disputes are confidential and may not be disclosed to any other person, are not admissible in any subsequent administrative, judicial or arbitration proceeding and may not be disclosed during testimony in, or during any discovery conducted as part of a subsequent proceeding, or introduced into evidence by the parties or the mediator in any subsequent proceeding so long as:

(a) The parties to the mediation and the agency have agreed in writing to the confidentiality of the mediation, and

(b) The person agreeing to the confidentiality of the mediation on behalf of the agency;

(A) Is neither a party to the dispute nor the mediator, and

(B) Is designated by the agency to authorize confidentiality for the mediation, and

(C) Is at the same or higher level in the agency than any of the parties to the mediation or who is a person with responsibility for human resources or personnel matters in the agency, unless the agency head or member of the governing board is one of the persons involved in the interpersonal dispute, in which case the Governor or the Governor's designee.

(7) Exceptions to confidentiality and inadmissibility.

(a) Any statements, memoranda, work products, documents and other materials, otherwise subject to discovery that were not prepared specifically for use in the mediation are not confidential and may be disclosed or introduced into evidence in a subsequent proceeding.

(b) Any mediation communications that are public records, as defined in ORS 192.410(4), and were not specifically prepared for use in the mediation are not confidential and may be disclosed or introduced into evidence in a subsequent proceeding unless the substance of the communication is confidential or privileged under state or federal law.

(c) A Mediation communication is not confidential and may be disclosed by any person receiving the communication to the extent that person reasonably believes that disclosing the communication is necessary to prevent the commission of a crime that is likely to result in death or bodily injury to any person. A mediation communication is not confidential and may be disclosed in a subsequent proceeding to the extent its disclosure may further the investigation or prosecution of a felony crime involving physical violence to a person.

(d) The parties to the mediation may agree in writing that all or part of the mediation communications are not confidential or that all or part of the mediation communications may be disclosed' and may be introduced into evidence in a subsequent proceedings unless the substance of the communication is confidential, privileged or otherwise prohibited from disclosure under state or federal law.

(e) A party to the mediation may disclose confidential mediation communications to a person if the party's communication with that person is privileged under ORS chapter 40 or other provision of law. A party to the mediation may disclose confidential mediation communications to a person for the purpose of obtaining advice concerning the subject matter of the mediation, if all the parties agree.

(f) A written mediation communication may be disclosed or introduced as evidence in a subsequent proceeding at the discretion of the party who prepared the communication so long as the communication is not otherwise confidential under state or federal law and does not contain confidential information from the mediation or another party who does not agree to the disclosure.

(g) In any proceeding to enforce, modify or set aside a mediation agreement, a party to the mediation may disclose mediation communications and such communications may be introduced as evidence to the extent necessary to prosecute or defend the matter. At the request of a party, the court may seal any part of the record of the proceeding to prevent further disclosure of the mediation communications or agreements to persons other than the parties to the agreement.

(h) In an action for damages or other relief between a party to the mediation and a mediator or mediation program, mediation communications are not confidential and may be disclosed and may be introduced as evidence to the extent necessary to prosecute or defend the matter. At the request of a party, the court may seal any part of the record of the proceeding to prevent further disclosure of the mediation communications or agreements.

(i) To the extent a mediation communication contains information the substance of which is required to be disclosed by Oregon statute, other than ORS 192.410 to 192.505, that portion of the communication may be disclosed as required by statute.

(j) The mediator may report the disposition of a mediation to the agency at the conclusion of the mediation so long as the report does not disclose specific confidential mediation communications. The agency or the mediator may use or disclose confidential mediation communications for research, training or educational purposes, subject to the provisions of ORS 36.232(4).

(8) The terms of any agreement arising out of the mediation of a workplace interpersonal dispute are confidential so long as the parties and the agency so agree in writing. Any term of an agreement that requires an expenditure of public funds, other than expenditures of $1,000 or less for employee training, employee counseling or purchasing of equipment that remain the property of the agency, may not be made confidential.

(9) When a mediation is subject to section (6) of this rule, the agency will provide to all parties to the mediation and to the mediator a copy of this rule or an explanation of where a copy of the rule may be obtained. Violation of this provision does not waive confidentiality of inadmissibility.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 36.224
Stats. Implemented: ORS 36.230(4)
Hist.: ODC 1-2000, f. & cert. ef. 10-18-00


Oregon Disabilities Commission Budget

 LFO Analyst: Britton

 

 

1995-97 Actual

 

1997-99 Estimated

 

1999-01 Governor's Recommended

 

1999-01 Legislatively Adopted

 

General Fund

 

219,198

 

235,504

 

282,917

 

282,119

 

Other Funds

 

563,355

 

583,739

 

1,028,573

 

996,209

 

Federal Funds

 

1,556,452

 

1,264,606

 

1,147,478

 

1,147,337

 

Total

 

2,339,005

 

2,083,849

 

2,458,968

 

2,425,665

 

Positions (FTE)

 

7.75

 

8.50

 

9.25

 

8.00

 

Program Description

 The Commission provides advocacy activities on behalf of disabled persons and administers three main programs: the federally funded Client Assistance Program (CAP), the Technology Access for Life Needs (TALN) program supported by a federal grant, and the Deaf and Hearing Impaired Access Program (DHIAP) that coordinates sign language interpreter services for state agencies. The Commission also acts as the state's coordinating agency for compliance with the federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The Commission is comprised of 15 members appointed by the Governor. Current activities are supported by 8.5 FTE, including an Executive Director.

The CAP provides referral, counseling, and ombudsman services to clients of independent living centers and persons who have applied for services through the Vocational Rehabilitation Division and the Commission for the Blind.

The TALN program offers information and demonstrations on assistive technology to persons with disabilities, their employers and representatives of agencies and programs that serve them.

 Revenue Sources & Relationships

 The CAP is entirely federally funded through the U.S. Department of Education's Rehabilitation Services Administration. Oregon has been designated as a "minimum allotment state" based on its population. Minimum allotment states receive at least $111,574 per federal fiscal year. The Commission can request additional funds from the U.S. Department of Education when re-allotments of funds unspent by other states are made. Although the agency has repeatedly requested additional funds from the U.S. Department of Education, there have never been additional funds available.

The TALN program is federally funded from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research of the U. S. Department of Education. The Commission was granted funds of $2.8 million for a five-year period (1995-2000). Although the Commission expected TALN funds to end March 31, 1999, recent congressional action extended funding for another five years. Both the CAP and TALN funding are free from any state matching requirements.

The DHIAP is funded by Other Funds from interagency agreements to provide hearing impaired translator services, sign language interpreter coordination, dispatching, training, and technical assistance. Contract agencies include the Department of Human Resources, the Employment Department, the Department of Transportation, and the Judicial Department. General Fund support is provided for administration and Commission expenses, general advocacy activities, and coordination of ADA implementation.

 Budget Environment

 The requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act continue to generate greater demands for services and access. Additionally, according to the Commission, in recent years the number of CAP cases has continued to increase but federal funding for the program has not kept pace. In addition, the recent federal Workforce Investment Act, which reauthorized the 1973 Rehabilitation Act, requires the Vocational Rehabilitation Division and the Commission for the Blind to place greater emphasis on consumer involvement in developing rehabilitation plans. How this may effect the CAP caseload is unknown, but it may cause an increase in the number of clients seeking assistance from the CAP program.

As noted above, federal funding for the TALN program, while continuing, is decreasing from about $1.1 million during the 1997-99 biennium to $630,000 during the 1999-01 biennium. The Commission intends to seek other sources of funds, such as donations, grants, and proceeds form Commission-sponsored conferences and workshops, to meet its statutory responsibilities and enhance its programs.

 Governor's Budget

 The Governor's recommended budget was 18 percent higher than the estimated expenditure level for the 1997-99 biennium. The current service level is significantly lower than the estimated expenditure level for the 1997-99 biennium

because in building its budget, the agency assumed that the federal TALN grant would not continue. Thus, the TALN program is not included in the current service level. The Governor's budget funded the current service level and added $995,866 to finance the following four policy packages:

· Federal TALN grant continuation ($630,000 Federal Funds). 

·Travel reimbursement for Commission designees to provide assistance to localities in resolving building code waiver requests that relate to accessibility for persons with disabilities ($19,652 General Fund). 

·Youth Leadership Forum for high school juniors and seniors with disabilities scheduled for summer 1999; the package would allow the Commission to accept and expend donated funds for the conference ($120,000 Other Funds). 

·American's with Disabilities Act (ADA) coordinator, staff assistant, and related expenses; the agency wants to market its expertise on ADA to other state government agencies. The Governor's budget provides position authority and expenditure limitation, but funding would be contingent on responses to the agency's marketing efforts ($226,214 Other Funds).

· Legislatively Adopted Budget

 The legislatively adopted budget of $2.4 million makes three modifications to the Governor's recommended budget. First, it makes a shift of $48,924 from personal services to services and supplies to address increasing costs for reasonable accommodation for Commission meetings. To fund the shift, one vacant interpreter position is eliminated. Second, the budget, while including the ADA coordinator package discussed above, reduces the package by $31,245 - reflecting the elimination of one Office Specialist position (0.5 FTE). In addition, the Department of Administrative Services agreed to unschedule the remaining portion ($194,969) of the ADA coordinator package until the Commission is able to secure contracts with other state agencies for this technical assistance. Third, the budget is reduced by $2,058 to reflect changes in Department of Administrative Services, Secretary of State Audits Division and Employment Relations Board charges. 


Appendix XX

 

Senior Services, Governor’s Commission on

ORS 410.320

 

Advises the Governor and the Director of Human Services on needs of the elderly; recommends action; advocates for the elderly.

 

Membership:

·        Total: 23+

·        Governor Appoints: 21+

·        Other Appointments: Speaker of the House--1; Senate President—1

 

Position Requirements:

·        A majority of members shall be 60 years of age or older

·        Persons broadly representative of public & private agencies, experienced/interested in the special needs of elderly persons

·        Persons active in organizations for elderly persons

·        Advocates for elderly persons

·        Persons active in advocacy organizations for low income, minority & disabled persons served by the Dept of Human Services 

 

GOVERNOR’S COMMISSION ON SENIOR SERVICES

410.320 Governor’s Commission on Senior Services. (1) The Governor’s Commission on Senior Services is created. The commission shall consist of at least 21 members appointed by the Governor for terms of three years.

(2) Prior to making appointments, the Governor shall request and consider recommendations from the area agencies on aging and other interested senior organizations. The Governor shall designate a member to serve at the pleasure of the Governor as chairperson for a term of two years with such duties as the Governor shall prescribe. The membership of the commission shall be composed of persons broadly representative of major public and private agencies who are experienced in or have demonstrated particular interest in the special needs of elderly persons, including persons who have been active in organizations and advocates on behalf of elderly persons. Additionally, membership shall include persons who are active in advocacy organizations representing the interests of disabled persons who are served in programs under the Department of Human Services and consumers of services provided primarily to elderly persons and disabled persons under department programs, including low income, minority and disabled persons. At least a majority of members shall be 60 years of age or older.

(3) The Governor’s Commission on Senior Services shall advise the Governor and the Director of Human Services on needs of elderly persons, and recommend actions by the Governor, the Department of Human Services, other governmental entities and the private sector, appropriate to meet such needs.

(4) The commission shall have authority to study programs and budgets of all state agencies that affect elderly persons. After such study, the commission shall make recommendations to the Governor and to the agencies involved. Such recommendations shall be designed to provide coordination of programs for elderly persons, to avoid unnecessary duplication in provision of services, and to point out gaps in provision of services. The commission shall also recommend development of a comprehensive plan for delivery of services to elderly persons. In carrying out these tasks, the commission shall coordinate its efforts with other advisory groups within the Department of Human Services to avoid duplication of effort.

(5) The commission shall promote responsible statewide advocacy for elderly persons.

(6) Members of the commission, other than legislators, shall be entitled to compensation and expenses as provided in ORS 292.495. [Formerly 184.900; 1983 c.740 §130; 1989 c.224 §79; 1991 c.67 §103; 2001 c.900 §82]

410.330 Legislator members; expenses. (1) In addition to the members of the Governor’s Commission on Senior Services appointed under ORS 410.320, the President of the Senate shall appoint one member from the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives shall appoint one member from the House of Representatives. If the Speaker of the House of Representatives or the President of the Senate is a member, either may designate from time to time an alternate from among the members of the appropriate house to exercise powers as a member of the commission except that the alternate shall not preside if the Speaker or President is chairperson.

(2) The members of the commission appointed under subsection (1) of this section shall be entitled to payment of compensation and expenses under ORS 171.072 from funds appropriated to the Legislative Assembly. [Formerly 184.905; 1983 c.740 §131; 1987 c.879 §15]

410.340 Appointments to fill vacancies. In case of a vacancy on the Governor’s Commission on Senior Services, the appointing authority shall appoint a successor for the remainder of the unexpired term. [Formerly 184.910; 1983 c.740 §132]

 

 

 


 

Appendix XXX: Oregon Commission for Women

COMMISSION FOR WOMEN

Commission for Women - Agency History

 

In 1964, the Commission for Women was created by executive order but it was not until 1977 that it received its first budget. The Commission is directed to work for the implementation and establishment of economic, social, legal, and political equality for women and to maintain a continuing assessment of the issues and needs confronting women in Oregon. Duties of the Commission include analyzing the legal status of women and men under the laws of Oregon relating to civil rights, contracts, income, property, and family in order to assure full equality and treatment under the law. Other duties of the Commission include monitoring the implementation of laws; educating women on legal rights and responsibilities; working for equal opportunity in employment; and evaluating educational and employment opportunities.

The Commission is comprised of eleven members, nine appointed by the Governor, with three-year terms which are confirmed by the Senate. Two members represent the Legislative Assembly and are appointed by the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House, and serve for two years.

Commission members have diverse backgrounds and experiences and a wide range of views about the issues which concern Oregon women. The interests and concerns of all women are well represented, and the Commission includes black, Hispanic and Native American members. This results in an united effort, and dedication to identifying and addressing the concerns of Oregon women.

 

185.510 Policy; report. (1) It is declared to be the policy and intent of the Legislative Assembly that the Commission for Women is created to work for the implementation and establishment of economic, social, legal and political equality for women and to maintain a continuing assessment of the issues and needs confronting women in Oregon.

(2) The commission shall submit to the Governor at the commencement of each biennium a report containing the concerns and issues confronting the women of Oregon which have been identified pursuant to the terms of ORS 185.510 to 185.550 and further identifying the programs, projects and activities which the commission will undertake regarding those issues. [1983 c.105 §1]

185.520 Commission for Women; confirmation; term; officers; meetings; funds. (1) The membership of the Commission for Women shall be comprised of 11 members, to include two representatives from the Legislative Assembly, one appointed by the President of the Senate, one appointed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives. Nine members shall be appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate pursuant to section 4, Article III, Oregon Constitution.

(2) Members appointed by the Governor shall serve for three-year terms. Legislators shall serve two-year terms.

(3) The Governor shall designate the chairperson of the commission to serve for a term of one year.

(4) Members shall meet at the call of the chairperson not less than three times annually.

(5) Consistent with Oregon law, the commission may receive and accept funds for purposes consistent with the creation of the commission. [1983 c.105 §2]

185.530 Special study committees. (1) The commission may establish ad hoc committees to study specific areas and make periodic reports to the commission.

(2) The chairpersons of such ad hoc committees shall be appointed by the chairperson of the commission, subject to approval by the commission.

(3) Membership on ad hoc committees shall not be limited to members of the commission.

(4) The period during which an ad hoc committee may function shall be determined at the time of its creation by the commission according to the nature of the study and project undertaken.

(5) Members of the ad hoc committees shall be designated as consultants to the full commission. [1983 c.105 §3; 1995 c.79 §67]

185.540 Duties. The Commission for Women shall:

(1)(a) Analyze the legal status of women and men under the laws of Oregon relating to civil rights, contracts, income, property and the family in order to assure full equality and treatment under the law;

(b) Monitor the implementation of laws affecting the legal rights and duties of women; and

(c) Educate women about their legal rights and responsibilities under the law.

(2)(a) Work for equal opportunity and treatment for women in employment through an analysis of the employment policies and practices of employers, both public and private;

(b) Evaluate the development of methods to assure fuller employment options for women including nontraditional job opportunities, child care, job sharing and flextime and part-time employment; and

(c) Examine methods to develop greater employment opportunities and potentials for women with particular consideration for the needs of minority women, older women, rural women and displaced homemakers.

(3)(a) Evaluate the progress of providing equality of educational opportunities for women in Oregon as mandated by state and federal law;

(b) Assist efforts to inform women about nontraditional educational and employment opportunities; and

(c) Promote the elimination of sexist and racist barriers in the educational process, such as staffing patterns, teacher training, curriculum and textbook selection.

(4)(a) Encourage women to pursue a variety of roles in life, both in the community and in the family;

(b) Promote the full recognition of the contributions of women whether in the home, as volunteers in the community or in the labor market;

(c) Promote the valuation of work within the home at a level comparable with work outside the home; and

(d) Investigate family relationships which are detrimental to women and to the development of productive family life.

(5) Encourage and recommend women to serve on appointive boards and commissions and encourage them to seek elective office.

(6) Identify and address issues which may be unique to special categories of women including minority women, juvenile women, older women, rural women and displaced homemakers. [1983 c.105 §5; 1995 c.79 §68; 1995 c.278 §29]

185.550 Compensation and expenses. (1) Members of the commission who are not members of the Legislative Assembly shall be paid compensation and expenses as provided in ORS 292.495. Such compensation and expenses shall be paid from the budget of the commission or from member agency accounts subject to applicable state law. Members of ad hoc committees shall not receive such compensation.

(2) Members of the commission who are members of the Legislative Assembly shall be paid compensation and expense reimbursement as provided in ORS 171.072, payable from funds appropriated to the Legislative Assembly. [1983 c.105 §4; 1987 c.879 §8; 1991 c.643 §36]

185.560 Service contracts for child care information and referral. (1) The Commission for Women may enter into service contracts on a competitive bid basis to public and private agencies, organizations and individuals for the purpose of establishing and operating community child care program information and referral services.

(2) The commission shall receive, evaluate and approve contract proposals pursuant to subsection (1) of this section.

(3) Contract proposals shall be in such form and contain such information as the commission shall specify.

(4) As used in this section, "child care program" means a publicly funded or privately operated program providing care of a child for a portion of the day, but less than 24 hours, outside of the child’s own home, but does not include any program whose primary component is psychiatric treatment. [1985 c.462 §1; 1995 c.278 §30]

185.570 Commission for Women Account. (1) There is created a Commission for Women Account in the General Fund of the State Treasury. All moneys in the account are continuously appropriated for and shall be used by the Commission for Women, created by Executive Order 75-9, to carry out its purposes.

(2) All gifts and grants received by the commission or by the state for purposes of the commission shall be deposited in the account. [Formerly 184.940]

 

 

Commission for Women Budget 

 LFO Analyst: Bender

.

 

1995-97 Actual

 

1997-99 Estimated

 

1999-01 Governor's Recommended

 

1999-01 Legislatively Adopted

 

General Fund

 

124,248

 

25,777

 

135,000

 

125,445

 

Other Funds

 

25,615

 

136,096

 

53,038

 

53,038

 

Total

 

149,863

 

161,873

 

188,038

 

178,483

 

Positions (FTE)

 

1.00

 

1.00

 

1.00

 

1.00

 

Program Description

 The Commission for Women was established by the Oregon Legislature in 1983 to work toward economic, social, legal, and political equality for women in Oregon. The Commission does this by identifying, analyzing, monitoring, and evaluating legal and other issues confronting women, by sponsoring forums on women's issues, and by engaging in legislative advocacy.

 Revenue Sources & Relationships

 The Commission generates Other Funds revenue through grants, contracts, and publication sales, and from its annual Women of Achievement dinner. These funds help the Commission conduct educational forums and special studies, produce publications, and otherwise carry out its mandated functions. In the 1997-99 biennium, the Commission also received $76,814 of state support as Other Funds. These funds were part of a General Fund appropriation to the Human Resources Services Division of the Department of Administrative Services for diversity issues. The Division transferred the funds appropriated to it roughly equally among the four advocacy commissions. For budget purposes, the Commission received these state funds as Other Funds, since they were passed through another agency's budget.

 Budget Environment

 In 1997, the legislature changed the focus of the Commission's funding from General Fund support to reliance on donations. The legislature reduced General Fund support of the Commission's budget to $25,000 - the same amount it provided to all four advocacy commissions. To allow the Commission the opportunity to operate at levels supported in the Governor's recommended budget, the Other Funds limitation was increased by $110,000 to offset the General Fund reduction. The $25,000 of General Fund support was to be used as seed money to enable the Commission to develop and implement a viable fundraising plan. The legislature also appropriated approximately $300,000 of General Fund to the Department of Administrative Services for diversity issues. This money was transferred to the four advocacy commissions. The Commission's portion of these funds, along with its $25,000 direct General Fund appropriation, provided it with $101,814 of state support in the 1997-99 biennium, a drop of 18% from what it had previously received.

This Commission has traditionally been the most successful among the advocacy commissions in raising Other Funds. These funds are used both to supplement the Commission's operating expenses and to finance the costs of the fund-raising activities themselves. For some time, the Commission has raised funds with its Women of Achievement dinner. Through 1997, the dinner raised approximately $10,000 each year for the Commission, net of the expenses associated with conducting it. In 1998, however, the dinner only netted approximately $2,000. The Commission raises additional funds from the sale of its Women and the Law book, and has received a grant to publish a quarterly newsletter. In the 1997-99 biennium, the Commission also received a new source of Other Funds - a $40,000 grant from Eli Lilly and Company to offer a series of forums on women's health care issues. The Commission expects this grant to be renewed at a reduced level in the next biennium.

With its fund-raising activities, the Commission has been able to maintain its operations during the 1997-99 biennium. It has kept a full-time executive director and met its office expenses. The focus of the Commission's activities has changed though. The health care forums have become a primary focus of Commission activity and consumed much of the executive director's time.

 Governor's Budget

 The Governor's budget reversed the 1997 Legislative Assembly's decision to make the advocacy commissions reliant on donations. The budget provided direct General Fund support of $135,000, and eliminated the General Fund transfer through the Human Resources Services Division. This is the same amount of support that the Governor had recommended in his 1997-99 biennium budget, but represented a 33 percent increase over what the state actually provided the Commission in 1997-99. The recommended amount would enable the Commission to pay all of the personal services cost of the executive director position and to cover general office expenses out of its General Fund appropriation. The Other Funds would then be available to cover the costs associated with the Women of Achievement dinners, the Eli Lilly and Company health care forums, and office enhancements.

 Legislatively Adopted Budget

 The legislature adopted the Governor's recommended budget with only minor modifications. General Fund support was reduced by 4 percent ($5,400) because of limited General Fund resources and to meet other budget priorities. The same 4 percent reduction was taken in the three other advocacy commission budgets as well. An additional $4,155 of General Fund was removed to match a reduction in state government service charges to the Commission.

The Department of Administrative Services' (DAS) budget contains an additional assessment reduction for extremely small agencies. This reduction will lower the Commission's state government service charges by $12,813 more than the amount referred to in the prior paragraph. General Fund to the Commission was not reduced in response to these DAS assessment reductions. Therefore, the Commission will have these funds available to meet other expenses.

 Source: Legislative Fiscal Office

 

 


 

Attachment B: States with Advisory Council:

 

AL, CT, FL, IA, IL, MA, MI, MN, MO, NE, NM, OH, OK, SC, TN, VA, WA, WV

State and Year of Inception

Year of Inception

By Statute

BY EO

TBI only

TBI with

# on Council

Funding

Lead Agencies

Arizona

1992

yes

no

no

Spinal Cord Injury

18

Trust Fund

Rehad Services

Colorado

2002

yes

yes

yes

 

32

 

 

Hawaii

1994

yes

no

yes

 

9

 

 

Iowa

1989

yes

no

yes

 

20

 

 

Kentucky

1998

yes

no

yes

 

9

Trust Fund

Disability Services

Louisiana 

1993

yes

no

no

Spinal Cord Injury

13

Trust Fund

Rehad Services

Nevada

1993

yes

no

yes

 

no funding

State appr/ revenue

Rehad Services

New Hampshire

1998

yes

no

no

Spinal Cord Injury

11

 

 

New Mexico

1997

yes

no

yes

 

18-Dec

Trust Fund & State appr/ revenue

Health

Tennessee

1993

yes

yes

yes

 

9

Trust Fund

Health

West Virginia

1996

yes

yes

no

Spinal Cord Injury

23

State appr/ revenue

 

 

States with Legislated Advisory Councils:

 

Texas and Nevada are quasi-governmental entities funded by a mix of federal and state dollars but carried out by a private sector contractor

 

 


Attachment C:  Colorado Advisory Board UpdateRemove this. Coordinated State Response Resource Information???? FWO

Appendix   :      Colorado Strategic Action Plan for Persons with Brain Injuries and Their Families

 

Colorado Strategic Action Plan

for Persons with Brain Injury

and Their Families

 

2001-2005

 

 

Directed by:

Colorado Brain Injury Advisory Board

Colorado Department of Human Services

Brain Injury Association of Colorado

 

Prepared by

Christine Engleby, M.S.

March 1, 2001

 

                                      

 


 

Introduction

 

This Strategic Action Plan has been prepared through a collaborative effort of the Colorado Brain Injury Advisory Board, the Colorado Department of Human Services, and the Brain Injury Association of Colorado.  Support for the development of this plan comes from grant number P05 MC 00036-01 from the federal Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau (HRSA-MCH).  Matching funds were provided by Colorado Developmental Disabilities Services, Colorado Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Denver Department of Human Services, and the Colorado Developmental Disabilities Planning Council.  In addition, the plan reflects the contributions of time, expertise, and other resources from a broad variety of stakeholders, including persons with brain injury, parents and other family members, government officials, health and advocacy organizations, public and private providers, state and local agencies, and others interested in brain injury issues. 

Purpose and Scope

The purpose of this plan is to describe an integrated, statewide system of care for persons with brain injury, and to identify action strategies which will lead to the development of such a system in Colorado over the next five years.  The federal HRSA-MCH planning grant focuses specifically on individuals with traumatic brain injuries (TBI).  However, recognizing that access and service issues are similar no matter how brain injuries are caused, Colorado's Brain Injury Advisory Board has chosen to adopt the following broad definition of brain injury:

Brain injury is defined as an injury to the brain of traumatic or acquired origin, which results in residual physical, cognitive, emotional and/or behavioral difficulties.

Traumatic brain injury is a major component of this definition, and has been the primary focus of the needs and resource assessments that have been conducted to prepare for this Strategic Action Plan.  However, the plan's action strategies have been designed to support a statewide system of care for persons with all types of brain injury.

Need

From 1991-99, over 26,000 Coloradoans of all ages were hospitalized with and survived a new TBI.  Colorado's incidence rate of non-fatal, hospitalized TBI averaged 80 per 100,000 persons over these nine years.  These figures do not include the many persons who were not immediately diagnosed or not hospitalized after injury.  Persons who sustain a brain injury but are not hospitalized has been estimated at over 80% of the total number of people who are injured.  Thus, a very conservative estimate of Colorado's overall incidence rate for brain injury would exceed 250 per 100,000 persons.  During 1999 alone, 2683 Coloradoans sustained and survived traumatic injuries to the brain that required at least one night of hospitalization, according to Colorado Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) surveillance data.  The Colorado Department of Education further estimates that more than 1,000 Colorado school age children sustain brain injuries annually, and about 75 percent of the students who return to school require individualized services related to their injuries.

 

Most survivors of severe brain injury experience serious, lifelong changes in their social, behavioral, physical and cognitive abilities.  The Colorado TBI Follow-up Project surveyed Coloradoans who had sustained traumatic brain injuries in 1996 one year after their injury.  The Project found that, of the 288 persons in the study who sustained severe brain injuries:

·over 41% continued to be significantly disabled after one year;

·27% had not returned to work or school; and

·almost 6% had been homeless, or had spent time in jail or prison during that year.

· 

The TBI Follow-up data also showed that, while more severe injuries are associated with more negative, long-term outcomes, substantial numbers of these outcomes occur at all levels of severity.  Often, persons with mild traumatic brain injury are not identified early on, and later require medical and non-medical services to continue with life activities that have been compromised as a result of their injuries.  For example, of 131 Coloradoans hospitalized with mild brain injuries in 1996, the TBI Follow-up Project found that:

·23% had difficulty driving;

·24% suffered from speech problems, and 24% had vision problems; and

·over 30% had significant disabilities after one year.

· 

While a number of providers offer services for persons with TBI, Colorado does not have a comprehensive system of care for these individuals and their families.  Services are fragmented and sometimes non-existent, especially in rural areas of the state.  Even where quality services do exist, they may not be accessible because of cost, eligibility requirements, or simply because the people in need do not know how to find them.  Moreover, a comprehensive system of care requires more than a network of accessible services.  An infrastructure to support the service network is also needed.  This infrastructure must include resources for information and referral, care coordination, education and support for service providers and families, research and evaluation, financial management and administration, and other important functions.  While some resources to support this infrastructure are available in Colorado, they are not part of a comprehensive system of care for persons with TBI.

 

Background and Historical Context

For many years, persons with brain injury, parents and other family members, health and advocacy organizations, providers, key state agencies and other Colorado stakeholders have been laying the groundwork for the development of this Strategic Action Plan.  Historically, the Brain Injury Association of Colorado (BIAC) has been the state's grassroots force behind BI prevention, survivor and family support, and systems development efforts.  Formed in 1980, BIAC serves as the clearinghouse for BI prevention, education and support programs; provides leadership for legislative/advocacy initiatives; and acts as a resource referral and access agency. 

Another important organization for early system development efforts in Colorado was the Rocky Mountain Regional Brain Injury Center (RMRBIC), which was established in 1989.  This four-year, federally-funded grant project covered the entire Rocky Mountain region.  However, its location in Colorado facilitated the beginning development of a statewide infrastructure to support persons with TBI and their families. 


Some Colorado initiatives promoted by RMRBIC include:

·formation of the BI Task Force (see next paragraph) in collaboration with BIAC;

·development of TBI surveillance activities located in the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment with funding from the Centers for Disease Control;

·implementation of prevention and educational activities; and

·development of a Medicaid Home and Community Based Services Waiver for Persons with Brain Injury (HCBS-BI).

· 

In 1992, BIAC and RMRBIC established the Brain Injury Task Force, an advocacy coalition whose primary purpose was to influence public policy and legislation.  BIAC and the Task Force successfully advocated for legislation focused on BI prevention, changes in automobile insurance, Medicaid managed care, attendant care, seat belts, and many other issues.  In late 1997, BIAC and the Task force formed the Brain Injury Legislative Coalition to study initiatives in other states and make recommendations for the establishment of a catastrophic fund for Coloradoans with BI.

 

Colorado entered a new phase of service system development through the involvement of the Colorado Department of Human Services (CDHS).  In February, 1998, BIAC representatives approached Department leaders with a request to collaborate on a HRSA-MCH planning grant for TBI.  Although the 1998 federal grant application was not successful, the Department's Office of Health and Rehabilitation Services (OHRS) agreed to take the lead on a statewide TBI planning initiative with approval from then Governor Roy Romer.  Supported by cash contributions from one local and three state agencies, an Advisory Board was formed, and needs assessments activities began through a contract with BIAC. 

Colorado's 1999 planning grant application to HRSA-MCHB was approved and funded, providing additional support for the development of the Strategic Action Plan.  Leadership and staffing for this planning initiative has been a collaborative effort by the Brain Injury Advisory Board, BIAC and CDHS.  In April, 2000, Governor Bill Owens formalized this involvement by designating CDHS as the lead state agency responsible for coordinating BI issues.  The Governor's Order (see Appendix 1) specifies that CDHS is responsible for:

·coordinating state agency activities related to brain injury;

·supporting the Brain Injury Advisory Board;

·gathering and analyzing needs and resource assessment data, and using these data to make recommendations regarding service needs;

·developing an inventory of services and data for the brain injured population; and

·facilitating funding requests to support the needs of the population, including federal and private support.

·The Order also names a number of state agencies that are to coordinate with CDHS, BIAC, providers, educational institutions, persons with TBI, families, and other relevant stakeholders.

Colorado Advisory Board for Persons with Brain Injury

The Colorado Brain Injury Advisory Board held its first meeting in October, 1998.  It is composed of 32 members, and includes persons with brain injuries, family members, representatives of key state agencies, public and private providers, higher education/research institutions, and advocacy organizations (see Appendix 2 for a roster of Board and committee members).  Approximately half of the Board members are persons with brain injuries or family members; several members play dual roles as agency representatives as well as survivors or family members.  The Advisory Board has been instrumental in the development of this Strategic Action Plan.  Specific functions of the Board in the planning process have included overseeing the needs and resource assessments, developing strategies to address the identified needs, prioritizing the strategies, and developing action steps designed to implement the priorities.

Planning Process

Development of this Strategic Action Plan began in early 1999 with a series of needs and resource assessments which are described in the following section.  The needs/resource assessment process was guided by the Colorado Brain Injury Advisory Board.  The Board formed two Needs and Resources Committees – one focused on children and adolescents, and the other for adults and older adults.  These committees met at least monthly for regularly for 1˝ years to oversee the development of assessment tools and methods, provide consultation on data collection, and evaluate results.  Final reports from these two committees (see Appendix 3) were used to develop a list of issues that formed the basis for the strategic plan.

Colorado TBI planning staff then prepared a summary analysis of eight planning issues which synthesized the results of the needs and resource assessments and incorporated the reports from the Needs and Resources Committees.  This analysis, which details needs, resources and potential strategies for each identified planning issue or theme, is included in a later section of this document.  It was used as the springboard for an all-day planning retreat of 55 Board and committee members and other stakeholders which was held on August 1, 2000.  Retreat participants used the analysis to develop a list of 23 strategies, each of which addresses one of more of the eight planning issues identified by the needs/resource analysis. 

Later that month, the Advisory Board's Steering Committee reviewed the list of strategies from the retreat, developing four top priority goals to be addressed through this Strategic Action Plan over the next five years.  The committee used the following prioritization criteria:

·         level of need identified in the assessments,

·         availability of resources and opportunities to support progress toward the goal, and

·         extent to which accomplishment of the goal would serve as a foundation for future efforts toward a system of care. 

At its September meeting, the Advisory Board ratified the four top priorities.  Additional stakeholder feedback was gathered at the annual BIAC conference in October, 2000, and a draft Strategic Action Plan was developed and submitted to the Board for review at its December, 2000 meeting.  Since that time, four new Board committees have been working to develop action steps to address each of the four priority goals, and work has begun on some of the action steps.  The last section of this document outlines the four priority goals, action steps, responsible parties and timelines.  Since this is a dynamic plan, it is recognized that the action items and priorities may change during the coming years based on changes in the environment, newly recognized needs, and opportunities that may arise.  The Brain Injury Advisory Board will be responsible for monitoring progress toward the achievement of the current goals, and for modifying the plan as needed.


Needs/Resource Assessments

 

Two types of resource assessments were conducted.  The first involved interviews with representatives of 24 state agencies to determine the agencies' awareness of, and involvement in TBI issues, and their perceptions of TBI needs and resources.  Needs and gaps identified by these informants included: 

·lack of awareness and information about TBI among consumers and providers,

·limited options for meeting long-term needs,

·identification and follow-up with children and adolescents,

·funding, and

·need for a single state agency with primary responsibility for BI issues. 

·In June, 2000, Pam Law, the Project Coordinator for Colorado's TBI planning initiative, completed a second resource assessment of public and private providers.  In-depth interviews were conducted with a representative sample of agency-based and individual providers of TBI services drawn from the Resource Directory compiled by the Brain Injury Association of Colorado.  System strengths identified through the resource assessments included:

·a strong foundation for research, data collection and identification of best practices through such resources as:  the surveillance program located at the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, the TBI Follow-up Study and Rocky Mountain Brain Injury System led by CDPHE and Craig Hospital, and nationally-known researchers at Colorado State University and the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center;

·active prevention programs conducted by both public and private sector agencies and organizations;

·a well-developed mechanism for statewide advocacy and support through the Brain Injury Association of Colorado and its network of support groups;

·the Medicaid Home and Community Based Waiver Program for persons with Brain Injury (HCBS-MI);

·a large number and variety of nationally-recognized treatment programs, located in both the public and private sectors;

·state and local agencies that were aware of the needs of persons with brain injuries, and willing to work toward solutions.

·Three methods were used to assess system and individual needs.  In October, 1999, eight community forums were held in conjunction with the annual BIAC conference.  Although each forum focused on a particular theme (e.g., rural issues, education issues for children and adolescents, experiences of adults five years after TBI), the discussions were wide ranging.  An analysis of the recorded discussions identified seven areas of unmet need or concern: 

·increased awareness about TBI for the general public,

·improved education/training for providers (including state agency and school personnel),

·information and resources for persons with TBI and families,

·increased funding to support services,

·coordination across systems and services, available and accessible services, and

·services and supports tailored to the special needs of ethnic/cultural minorities and rural residents.

·A second needs assessment method used a printed questionnaire, which was distributed at the statewide BIAC conference, through its newsletter, and at support groups across the state.  Completed questionnaires were received from 352 individuals, including 158 persons with TBI, 83 family members, 103 providers, and eight others.  Data from the questionnaire were analyzed and results reported to the Board in March, 2000.  This survey identified care coordination as the greatest service need.  Barriers endorsed as "huge obstacles" by over 60% of the respondents included: 

·"service system is confusing,"

·"it's hard to get information about available services,"

·"it's hard to know where to start to get services," and

·"not enough providers with specialized knowledge." 

·Finally, the Board and committees analyzed and evaluated data from the statewide TBI surveillance system based at the Injury Epidemiology Program at the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, and from the TBI Follow-Up System managed by Craig Hospital in Denver.  Both of these systems are supported by grants from the federal Centers for Disease Control. 

 

 

Summary Analysis of Needs, Resources
and Planning Issues

 

The following analysis was prepared by staff of the TBI Planning Project for use at the August 1, 2000, planning retreat of the Colorado Brain Injury Advisory Board.  It was prepared by analyzing and compiling the results of the needs and resource assessments, including the TBI Follow-up Study, and the reports from the two Needs and Resource sub-committees of the Board which may be found in Appendix 3.

 

Issue:  Research/Data/Evaluation

Resources/Opportunities

·Colorado TBI Registry – Dept. of Public Health and Environment

·Colorado TBI Follow-Up Study – CDPHE and Craig

·CSU Qualitative Studies (Pat Sample)

·Colorado Model Systems Project (Craig, St. Anthony's, etc)

·Some information in existing data systems (Medicaid waiver, Voc Rehab, Workers Comp, insurance companies, Denver VA Hospital)

·St. Anthony's Central Emergency Department 30-day follow-up study

·Potential opportunities for research/evaluation studies from Centers for Disease Control and National Institute of Disability Rehabilitation and Research

·Existing infrastructure and expertise in BI data collection/analysis, evaluation and research on BI at Health Dept., Craig, CSU, UCHSC, St. Anthony's, VA, etc.

·Needs

·Follow-up studies on children and adolescents (under 16)

·Information on prevalence of non-hospitalized/mild brain injuries

·Identification of what services work best for which types of people with BI

·Identification of number of persons in nursing homes, corrections, etc., with BI

· 

Issue:  Information, Education, and Support for Persons with TBI and Families

Resources/Opportunities

·BIAC Information and Referral function

·Health Dept. surveillance and Craig follow-up study

·BIAC Support Groups

·Some support groups sponsored by providers

·BIAC peer advocates/family advocates

·Dept. of Education is developing curriculum for teachers

·Identification of survivors through TBI Registry and Craig Follow-Up Study

·Many types of printed informational/educational materials for survivors, family already exist from national and state sources

·Needs

·Statewide referral system to direct survivors/family to providers and resources

·Training for BIAC Information and Referral staff for appropriate resource referral

·Screening instrument to identify BI in school, corrections, MH and other populations

·Education for teachers, coaches, law enforcement, etc., regarding signs and symptoms of BI

·Public awareness of different levels of brain injury and need for follow up

·Community outreach coordinators/advocates

·Support groups and other mechanisms for support in rural areas

·Specialized information/outreach/support for different ethnic/cultural groups

·Method of contacting survivors after discharge

· 


Issue:  Information, Education, Training and Support for Service Providers and Other Professionals

Resources/Opportunities

·BIAC/BIA Conferences

·Informational materials for teachers, coaches, emergency room staff, etc. from BIA, Centers for Disease Control, federal grant projects

·Training resources at CSU, UCHSC, etc.

·Needs

·Better education about brain injury, including recognizing signs and symptoms, for medical professionals, teachers, emergency room staff, law enforcement, mental health and substance abuse providers, etc.

·Awareness/education for state agency staff, related providers

·Credentialing process for providers of brain injury services

·Support/consultation network for rural providers

· 

Issue:  Resource Expansion, System and Policy Changes

Resources/Opportunities

·Existing Brain Injury Advisory Board

·Governor's Order authorizing Dept. of Human Services to coordinate BI issues

·State Worker's Compensation System and Guidelines

·Existing BI and Elderly, Blind and Disabled Medicaid Waiver programs

·Developmental Disabilities system

·BI Legislative Coalition

·Needs/Implementation Barriers

·Change policies/regulations to provide more flexible, longer-term services

·Recognition for needs of persons with "mild" injuries

·Policies that provide treatment for persons with co-occurring disorders

·Interagency collaboration/service coordination

·Increased public funding for services/care coordination

·Increased reimbursement rates for providers with BI treatment expertise

· 

Issue:  Care Coordination/Advocacy/Case Management

Resources/Opportunities

·BIA Self Advocacy for Independent Living (SAIL) Program

·Single Entry Point Agencies throughout the state

·Private care coordination/case management providers

·Needs

·Training for existing staff who perform case management/care coordination function (e.g., single entry points)

·Funding for care coordination system

·Mechanisms for timely referrals/liaisons with providers

·Extended care coordination for persons with lifelong needs

· 

Issue:  Long-Term Services and Supports

Resources/Opportunities

·Dept. of Human Services Supportive Housing and Homeless program

·Craig Model Systems projects

·Numerous providers with appropriate expertise

·Vocational Rehabilitation system

·BI and Elderly, Blind and Disabled waiver programs

·Ticket to Work Act

·Community colleges and occupational education system

·Independent Living Centers

·Adult Protective Services/Guardianship programs

·Needs

·Housing – assisted living programs

·Increased availability of independent living skills training

·Respite care

·Mental health treatment for depression, etc.

·Vocational/employment programs, flexible job opportunities

·Community re-entry services after hospitalization to facilitate transitions to school and work

·Training for vocational rehabilitation counselors, housing specialists and others who provide long-term care

·Resources for cognitive re-training services and management of severe behavior problems

·Mechanisms for lifelong supports

· 

Issue:  Education-Related Strategies for Children and Adolescents

Resources/Opportunities

·New Start Program at Center for Community Participation at CSU, including screening tool

·Brain Stars at Children's Hospital

·Department of Education training manual being developed

·TBI teams in some school districts

·Extensive resources available nationally

·Needs

·identification of students with unrecognized TBI

·changes in educational policies/practices that present barriers to effective support of students with TBI

·awareness/education/training for teachers and other school personnel

·awareness/education for parents regarding rights, services

·development/expansion of transitional services from high school to college

· 

Issue:  Special Strategies for Persons in Rural Areas

Resources/Opportunities

·expertise and infrastructure at CSU

·existing providers in Grand Junction, Greeley, Ft. Collins, other rural communities

·Independent Living Centers located in rural communities

·Single Entry Point agencies and Medicaid waiver program providers

·Needs

·housing/assisted living facilities

·improved access to providers of all types

·more support groups and peer advocacy through BIAC or other agencies

·assistance with transportation

·support/education for rural providers, including MH, vocational counselors, law enforcement, etc.

· 

 

Recommended Strategies for TBI Action Plan

Brain Injury Advisory Board Planning Retreat

August 1, 2000

 

Care Coordination/Advocacy:

1.0.One-stop, single entry point for systems navigation

·Partnership between State and BIAC

·Professional/peer team

·Options to contract at community level with vocational rehabilitation, public health, etc.

· 

2.0.Elective, standardized certification/training program for persons who provide case management/care coordination

·Develop core curriculum and training delivery plan

·Develop criteria for certification

·Coordinate delivery with BIAC annual conference

· 

Children/Education:

3.0.Improve ability of school personnel to educate/support students w/BI

·Screening tool to help school personnel identify students with unrecognized BI

·Reinstate BI teams

·Develop educational packet to be given at hospital or back to school night -include information on Section 504 of the federal Disabilities Act and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)

·Link on Colorado Department of Education (CDE) website to BIAC, other resources

· 

4.0.Policy/intersystem changes in schools

·Develop standard Individualized Education Plan (IEP) guidelines for all school districts for students w/BI

·Change law so that every student w/BI has an IEP

·Help school districts develop systems to address needs of students w/BI

·Develop standardized process/guidelines for transition from hospital to school

·Include information on BI in university coursework for teachers

· 

5.0.Direct community support services for children and adolescents

·Support groups

·Play groups

·Parent training

·Case management/advocacy for child and family

·Central resource clearinghouse

·Activity center/website for peer support

· 

Funding/Policy Changes:

6.0.Change policies in state agencies that would improve services for people with BI

·Meet with appropriate state agencies including divisions internal to CDHS

·Identify coordinator in each agency

·Hold meetings in each agency of persons involved in BI issues

·Identify policy changes that would improve services

·Implement policy changes as identified

· 

7.0.Awareness/education for legislators and public

·Grassroots education effort:  families, young voters, etc.

·Develop packets for legislators, sports participants, emergency rooms, etc.

·Develop website for information and referral for communities

·Get Governor's Proclamation for Brain Injury Awareness Month

·Conduct research for catastrophic fund

·Develop PSAs for radio and television, short articles for newspapers

· 

8.0.Implement user tax to cover funding for majority of population with BI.  Funding to be used for early identification and treatment

·Fee added to motorcycle registration, bicycle registration, ski lift tickets, drivers' license fee, athletic activity fee, etc.

·Obtain actuarial projection for amount required and largest causes

·Legislation to enact user taxes in 2002 session

·Funds to go to Department of Human Services

· 

Information/Education/Support for Individuals with BI and Families

9.0.Create a Colorado 1-800 number with trained staff for information, referral and support

·Design program

·Prepare budget and obtain funding

·Update resource directory and website

·Develop recorded menu and website information

·Develop training, hire and train staff

·Market availability of 1-800 number

·Maintain resource directory and website

· 

10.0.Expand peer advocacy program statewide

·Hire staff

·Develop standardized training materials

· 

11.0.Increase information to community

·Develop brochure for distribution to hospitals and schools

·Speakers bureau – for schools, senior centers, sports organizations, prisons, social security, fire departments/police, homeless shelters, support

·1-800 helpline

· 

12.0.Increase public awareness

·Develop brochures/presentations on special topics (e.g., insurance issues, brochures for ethnic/cultural minorities)

·Create public awareness team

·Speakers bureau

· 

Long-Term Services and Supports

13.0.Develop a prototype of a functionally-based, individualized system of long-term services and supports

·Research other state models, including delivery system and funding

·Define parameters and characteristics of a system of supportive services

·Research funding streams for support, including private pay, public and user fees.

·Develop pilot program, include supported living services (housing and/or mentoring) and non-medical supportive services

·Evaluate program

· 


Provider Education:

14.0.Provide statewide/regional training for educators, school personnel, state employees, etc. (positions that are gatekeepers to services for people who might not access services on their own)

·Identify target groups and educational content of the training

·Develop training plan

·Deliver training

·Evaluate program

· 

15.0.Develop provider network, resources (printed materials, verbal information), and credentialing process

·Recruit statewide providers for network development

·Develop information clearinghouse (fact sheets, brochures, website, speakers bureau, information for MDs and emergency room personnel, etc.)

·Develop resource library for information and referral

·Marketing plan to inform providers of availability

·Education campaign for gatekeepers

·Change university curricula for professional disciplines to include information on BI

·Develop credentialing process

· 

16.0.Create BI division within CDHS responsible for educating other state departments, law enforcement agencies, schools, other Colorado service providers

·Pilot project in medical schools and allied health education programs, target training to emergency room personnel focused on early diagnosis and resource identification and management

·Provide resource information that emergency room personnel can hand persons with BI diagnoses, especially outpatients, for follow-up

· 

17.0.Educational information for hospitals to give to patients with BI and families

·Paid position to visit hospitals and hand out materials (e.g., magnets with 1-800 number)

·Same person educates hospital staff and other providers at lunchtime inservices

· 

18.0.Develop screening tool for use in schools by teachers and other personnel

·Adapt/build on screening tool developed by the Center for Community Participation, now being piloted in Poudre School District

·Develop implementation process for statewide implementation

·Develop and conduct training on how to use tool

·Implement statewide

· 

19.0.Develop screening tool for use in emergency rooms, and by emergency medical technicians

·Attach tool to existing medical history for new patients

·Educate General Practitioners and other doctors on appropriate questions to ask when signs and symptoms are present – use screening tool

·Have screening tool in ER, implement sideline card from Jim Kelly

·EMTs use check list, sideline cards

·Respond First Aid include card/checklist

· 

Research:

20.0.Count and identify all children and adolescents ages 0-16 with BI

·Get numbers from Health Dept. database of children hospitalized with TBI since 1991

·Contact hospitals in the state – to count TBI admissions from 83-91

·Centers for Disease Control pilot project?

· 

21.0.Count and identify all persons with mild BI who are not hospitalized

·Use ER data to count people with post-concussive syndrome

·Survey nursing homes in state association to identify number of individuals seen with mild TBI

· 

Rural Issues:

22.0.State-funded training programs for education and awareness

·Conduct training for medical personnel, attorneys, care providers, hospitals, and CDHS staff

·Create consistent training programs for peer advocates

·Expand community education (community/service/religious organizations, school/PTA, government/political groups, etc.)

· 

23.0.Increase access to resources for people involved with BI

·Use high tech/video conferencing for telemedicine/support

·Develop marketing plan – newsletters, etc.

· 

 

 


Prioritized Strategies and Action Plan

 

 

Strategy/Goal:            Create a clearinghouse for information, referral and support which can be accessed through a 1-800 number, has trained staff available, and includes a website, resource directory, and information library.

Priority

1

Action Steps:

Timeframe

Resources Needed

Responsibility

Design clearinghouse program

By 1/2001

Information re: models from other states

Statewide information & referral committee

Prepare budget and obtain funding

By 3/2001

Grant from HRSA/MCHB

CDHS, BIAC, Advisory Board

Develop recorded menu, website information

By 7/2001

1-800-number
Website developer

BIAC, I&R specialists

Develop training, hire and train staff

By 8/2001

Training program

RATC, BIAC, CDHS

Update resource directory and website

By 9/2001

Website consultation, $$ for materials development

BIAC, website consultant, I & R committee

Compile information library

By 9/2001

Materials from national sources, assistance from TBI-TAC media specialist

BIAC, I&R specialists, CDHS

Develop marketing plan and materials to advertise availability of clearinghouse.

By 9/2001

Consultation from CDHS Public Info. Director
Logo/marketing materials
PSA’s, press releases, other marketing methods

BIAC, CDHS, statewide information & referral committee

Provide I & R services to 300 persons/organizations

8/2001-3/2002

Website, 1-800-number, info. library, directory, eMail

I & R specialists

Evaluate Year One program

12/2001-3/2002

Program eval. consultation, program data

Prog. evaluator, CDHS prog. assistant, BIAC, Advisory Bd.

Expand/update resource directory, website, information library, and advertising campaign.

3-7/2002

Materials, feedback from evaluation

BIAC, CDHS

Develop plan for sustaining program after grant funding ends.

4-9/2002

 

CDHS, BIAC, Advisory Bd.

Provide I & R services to 1000 persons/organizations

4/2002-3/2003

Website, 1-800-number, info. library, directory, eMail

I & R specialists

Evaluate Year Two program

12/2002-3/2003

Program eval. consultation, program data

Prog. evaluator, CDHS prog. assistant, BIAC, Advisory Bd.

Expand/update resource directory, website, information library and advertising campaign.

3-7/2003

Materials, feedback from evaluation

BIAC, CDHS

Provide I & R services to 2000 persons/organizations

4/2003-3/2004

Website, 1-800-number, info. library, directory, eMail

I & R specialists

Implement plan for sustaining program after grant funding ends.

9/2002-3/2004

Program evaluation data, resources from state and/or private sources.

CDHS, BIAC, Advisory Board

Evaluate Year Three program

12/2003-3/2004

Program eval. consultation, program data

Prog. evaluator, CDHS prog. assistant, BIAC, Advisory Bd.

Expand/update resource directory, website, advertising campaign and information library

3-7/2004

Materials, feedback from evaluation

BIAC, CDHS

 


 

Strategy/Goal:  Enhance local service systems for persons with TBI by developing and piloting rural and urban programs for information exchange, resource identification, and coordination of services and supports.

Priority

2

Action Steps:

Timeframe

Resources Needed

Responsibility

Design local information, referral and resource coordination program, and select pilot sites

By 1/2001

Information re: models from other states, resource information from potential pilot sites.

Local resource coordination committee

Prepare budget and obtain funding

By 3/2001

Grant from HRSA/MCHB

CDHS, BIAC, Advisory Board

Develop training program, hire and train staff

By 8/2001

Training program, materials

RATC, BIAC, CDHS

Develop local networks composed of providers, survivors, families, professionals.

By 11/2001

Assistance from Board members, support groups & state agency reps. to identify members

Local staff, BIAC, CDHS, local resource coordination committee

Provide training to network members

Ongoing

Training curriculum & materials from state agency training (see goal 4 below).

Local staff, CDHS, BIAC

Provide local I&R services to 30 persons in each pilot site.

9/2001-3/2002

Coordination w/state I&R function, resource directory, assistance from local providers

Local staff, BIAC, CDHS

Provide access to services for 10 persons in each pilot site.

9/2001-3/2002

Assistance from state agencies and local network members.

Local network, local staff

Evaluate local pilots and make changes as necessary.

1-3/2002

Data collection, program evaluation results

Program evaluator, CDHS, BIAC, Advisory Board, local network

Provide local I&R services to 100 persons in each pilot site.

4/2002-3/2003

Coordination w/state I&R function, resource directory, assistance from providers

Local staff, BIAC, CDHS